Massage Therapy & Injury Recovery

Therapeutic massage is one of earliest, natural, and most corrective forms of healthcare. Not only is it effective for prevention of injuries, but massage therapy is highly beneficial when combined with the physical rehabilitation of an injury. In fact, a system of exercises and hands-on treatment developed by Swedish physiotherapist Pehr Henrik Ling developed into modern day physical therapy, and the hands-on treatment is now known as Swedish Massage.

Using the Right Technique

Whether you are recuperating from a sports-related injury, post-surgery, an accident, or a genetic condition, receiving massage can accelerate the success of your rehabilitation by aiding circulatory movement and relaxing muscles, which can improve strength, increase motion, and reduce pain. Of course, the type of massage a patient receives is dependent upon the injury, and progresses as the level of physical therapy treatment advances.

For example, post-surgery or acute care patients require easy modalities that can help with swelling and pain like lymph drainage or effleurage. Deep pressure modalities can aid in the healing process by reducing the growth of scar tissue, as well as improve range of motion in the exercise stage of a patient’s rehabilitation.

Finding the Right Massage Therapist

Getting the right kind of massage treatment for your rehabilitation starts with finding the right kind of massage therapist. While many types of massage techniques can help bring comfort and relaxation to the injured or recovering patient, a clinical massage therapist knows how to specifically and safely combine massage therapy with your type of injury. Therapeutic massage is different from a massage for relaxation. Clinical massage therapists have more experience and advanced education in anatomy and kinesiology. Typically working in conjunction with your doctor or physical therapist, they’ll develop a care plan based on your own physical goals.

Preventative medicine is one of those phrases that has become a cornerstone in our healthcare lexicon. Even after rehabilitation ends for a patient, continuing to receive therapeutic massage can help keep your body’s muscles and connective tissues mobile, which is crucial for promoting wellness and preventing re-injury.

Looking for a rewarding career in health and wellness?

LHAA offers an exemplary Massage Therapy Training Program where students will learn the science, practice, and business of massage therapy through highly focused classroom instruction as well as hands-on experience working with the public. Find out more information here.